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Bend, Oregon is the greatest place to live on Earth. 
Let's keep it that way.

My goals:

  • Strong Economy
  • Strategic Leadership
  • Affordable Housing
  • Back to Basics

News

Monday, May 22, 2017 12:00 AM

Editorial: Bend staff should not police councilor comments

From the article: Councilor Barb Campbell proposed last week that the city of Bend’s communications staff should monitor statements made by councilors and tell the public when the statements are “just plain false.”
It’s a terrible idea. City staff should not be the thought police for the City Council.
Campbell said one reason she suggested it was Councilor Bill Moseley’s Facebook posts.


Monday, February 13, 2017 10:02 AM

Legislative Outlook 2017

Bend Business Journal, 2017 Issue 1
Click here to view the article.

Bend City Councilor, Bill Moseley, weighed in on the transportation concerns Kancler raised. Voicing his frustration with the Land Conservation and Development Committee (LCDC), he pointed out that several projects in Bend were heavily influenced by the out-of-area committee.

"We eliminated a turn lane on Franklin, going southbound on Third Street for the purpose of increasing congestion on our street so people may bake and walk more, because the state's goal in the legislature is to reduce American's utilization of vehicles," said Moseley. "All these measured actions make it more difficult for municipal government to have the freedom to build out its road system, especially in a growing community."


Thursday, January 19, 2017 12:00 AM

New Bend council (barely) sticks to climate change path

BEND, Ore. - When three new members join four veterans on the Bend City Council, things can change right away. Or not.


Thursday, October 20, 2016 11:55 AM

Frank Turek and Bill Moseley Radio Commercial


Wednesday, October 12, 2016 12:01 AM

Bend Bulletin Editorial: Bill Moseley for Bend City Council

Bill Moseley is an impressive candidate for Bend City Council. Voters should elect him to replace Councilor Doug Knight for Position 2.

Knight’s work on the council has been a mixed bag. It’s hard not to admire the way he advocated for requirements on short-term rentals and made a failed push to have the city notify residents when a neighbor was putting up an accessory dwelling unit.

But he has also led the council into a policy cul-de-sac by championing the city’s climate action resolution. That was sprung on the council as ready for a vote. Not only was it not ready for a vote, it has drawn city time and money away from core services that Bend must provide. Moseley will pull the council’s decision making to the center of its responsibilities.

Knight, 50, sometimes has forgotten that the council in Bend is a policy-making body. It does not have a role in managing city staff other than the city administrator. Knight has apologized, but he crossed that line more than once and even berated city staff.

There are a number of other ways to slice the differences between the two. One way to think about them is in terms of regulation. Knight favors more. Moseley thinks less is more. That’s an oversimplification, but, for instance, Knight is more supportive of the increased density required by the state for Bend. Moseley wants to push back on the state’s urban growth boundary regulations.

Moseley should not be pigeonholed as a pro-growth, business candidate. He says he will listen to all sides. And he’s doing it. He took it upon himself to seek input from members of Central Oregon LandWatch, the environmental group, on Bend issues.

Moseley, 47, built a software business from the ground up in Bend, GL Solutions. It has some 63 employees. Before that he worked for the Oregon Department of Justice overseeing charitable fundraising and gaming activities. Those experiences give him leadership and business skills to take a strategic approach to focusing on the city’s real problems — not tangents. Vote Moseley.


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